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SINGAPORE ENVIRONMENTAL INDUSTRY DIRECTORY 2019/2020
The special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change projects that, based on current global efforts, the world will face a 3°C temperature rise by the end of the century. If we are to meet the Paris goal of limiting this to 1.5°C, global emissions need to
peak, come down, and then reach net zero around 2050. Countries therefore have to significantly step
up their collective climate action.
TEO CHEE HEAN
DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER
goal of limiting this to 1.5°C, global emissions need to peak, come down, and then reach net zero around 2050. Countries therefore have to signi cantly step up their collective climate action.”
Curbing Carbon Emissions
Under the Paris Agreement on climate change, Singapore has pledged to reduce its emissions intensity (emissions per dollar of gross domestic product) by 36% from 2005 levels by 2030, the same year when its emissions are expected to reach a peak.
Its key strategy is to improve industrial energy ef ciency by levying a carbon tax on heavy emitters. From 2019, some 30 to 40 companies responsible for 80% of the greenhouse gas emissions will have to pay a carbon tax. For the  rst  ve years, it will be S$5 per tonne, increasing possibly to S$15 by 2030.
Transport, which accounts for about 15% of total emissions, is next in line. From February
2018, the Land Transport Authority (LTA) has cut the permissible car and motorcycle growth rate to zero from the previous 0.25% per annum.
Public transport has been made more user-friendly to encourage commuters to make the switch. By 2030, Singapore’s rail network will extend to 360 km from 230 km today, comparable to London and New York, serving more households directly. Bus service standards are being improved with the addition of more buses and more routes.
Taking cognisance of the UHI phenomenon, Singapore is placing greater emphasis on research and planning. Cooling Singapore – a research initiative launched in 2017 – is exploring different means to mitigate the UHI effect, from greenery to urban geometry. By varying building heights for instance, wind  ow can be improved. The use of light-coloured or re ective surfaces on pavements and building facades can lower absorption of heat energy from the sun.
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