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SINGAPORE ENVIRONMENTAL INDUSTRY DIRECTORY 2020/2021
The shift from
a voluntary to mandatory approach in ensuring resource sustainability is
not something the Government takes lightly, but only after careful consideration and consultation.
DR AMY KHOR,
SENIOR MINISTER OF STATE FOR THE MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT AND WATER RESOURCES (MEWR)
In e-waste for instance, preliminary studies have shown that if Singapore were to recover and reuse materials from e-waste, it can reap a net bene t of S$40 million.
A start is being made. Singapore’s largest e-waste recycler TES is opening two new recycling facilities – TES B in Singapore and Recupyl in France. Costing S$25 million, the new facilities will treat lithium-ion batteries for the Asian and European markets, two regions with large quantities of scrapped lithium-ion battery.
Lithium-ion batteries are used in personal mobility devices, handphones, laptops and power banks. Studies conducted by TES show that Singapore households will generate about a thousand tonnes of waste batteries by 2021, with lithium-ion batteries accounting for half the total. Currently, an estimated five percent are collected and recycled properly.
Operational in February 2020, the Singapore facility TES B can recycle 14 tonnes of lithium-ion batteries - or the equivalent of about 280,000 smartphone batteries - each day.
TES is employing an innovative recycling process that utilises proprietary in-house technology and equipment. End-of-life batteries are broken up with auto punching machines and shredders. Magnetic separators are then used to recover the copper and aluminium, while a chemical treatment process is used to recover cobalt and lithium.
Senior Minister of State for Trade and Industry Dr Koh Poh Koon was delighted with TES’ decision to establish a lithium recycling facility. Speaking at the Asia Clean Energy Summit on 30 October 2019, Dr Koh remarked, “This is an exciting development as the use of batteries for grid-related energy storage is projected to grow globally to manage the increasing adoption of intermittent renewable energy such as solar.”
By moving from a traditional linear system to a closed-loop cycle, we can reduce the need to constantly source for raw materials, paving the way to a more sustainable future.
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